Book Review: Textbook of Integrative Clinical Nutrition

Author: J. Prousky ND. MSc
Publisher: CCNM Press
Book Publication: 2012

Dr. Prousky’s new and updated edition of this classic textbook is a gold mine for patients and doctors alike who wish to find out just exactly what the difference in practice and diagnosis is between “orthomolecular” medicine and “toxicmolecular” medicine.

The term “orthomolecular” was coined by the late great Linus Pauling and refers to the right natural molecule needed by an organism to maintain health – and to cure most disease in pharmaceutically effective doses. The term “toxicmolecular” was coined by the late Dr. Bernard Rimland, author of Infantile Autism – a book that infuriated mainstream defenders of vaccines.

Dr. Prousky is editor of the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, founded originally by Dr. Abram Hoffer. This small and thoroughly truthful journal, upon which I have relied for so many years now, shares with the famous online open access journal PLOS Medicine a deep commitment to presenting careful research, clinical results, and patient outcomes, as opposed to the lure of fame and fortune.

As the Chief Naturo­pathic Medical Officer of the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine located in Toronto, Dr. Prousky has taught the Year Three Clinical Nutrition Course there for the past 12 years. He holds enough impressive degrees, and has so many years of teaching and clinical practice experience, that it is no surprise he can so clearly and systematically lay out the facts about food and health, and the therapeutic applications of specific nutrients to specific diseases. He does this so beautifully and provides such excellent sources from mainstream research, that one gets drawn into reading this book wanting to know what comes next. Health as a “grand system” unfolds before one’s eyes.

The tone of the book is totally focused on how to achieve good clinical outcomes. For me, who is so involved in the legal and political war zone of modern medicine, reading this textbook is rather like applying vitamin E on a burn – aaah!

Last fall, this book landed on my desk just as I was working on my November 2012 feature for Vitality, “Toxic Psychiatry” (included and updated in this book). The academic battles in psychiatry make feathers fly like no other field, and to heck with the patients. I am inescapably involved in this battle because I published Hoffer’s wonderful scientific memoirs, Adventures in Psychiatry (KOS, 2005) which annoys so many and pleases undoubtedly many more. Toximolecular psychiatrists cannot stand the fact that the first ever double-blind placebo-controlled studies comparing nutritional supplementation to drugs in schizophrenic patients were conducted by Hoffer and published in the leading international journals – complete with 10-year follow-up studies to boot.

While working on my article, I had been wading for some weeks through the morass of arrogant dismissal of the published facts and continued excellent outcomes to this day, and so I turned to Prousky’s book, opening it immediately at the section on schizophrenia. To my delight I found there a systematic analysis of those early publications, the current follow-up results on Hoffer’s pioneering work – all laid out in tidy, accessible patterns, fully supported by current published evidence, rather like a lovely Persian carpet. Yes! Here the industry propaganda was absent, and only the truth about nutritional medicine’s excellent outcomes was spelled out without emotion, jargon, or extraneous opinion.

Dr. Hoffer’s son, John, is a professor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal. He wrote a most helpful preface to this textbook in which he stated: “The great merit of this textbook is that it can be integrated with conventional therapies. When conventional medicine is ineffective, too risky, inadequately supported by evidence, or runs against a patient’s preferences and values, clinical nutrition can play a complementary role by pointing out biologically and clinically promising… approaches.”

Prousky’s presentation on what we must learn about “biochemical individuality” is especially helpful. He makes it clear why in orthomolecular medicine the patient-doctor relationship focuses on the genetic, deep, and personal historical biology of the patient. This is not your one-size-fits-all approach we have become used to. It is not possible to be healthy and recover from disease without good food tailored to our individual needs. How to find out the details is what this book teaches.

Textbooks are expensive, and this one is, too. However, there are many of us who want to check out what our standard doctors advise and find out if there may be something else that is not as scary; and there are many of us who doubt that long-term standard drug routines are such a good idea; finally there are many, and I have often been among them, who cannot avoid using a toxic drug in situations where that is the only possible course of action. That’s when consulting this book can cool down anxiety and offer rational assistance supported by impeccable research. For those who cannot afford this book, I suggest they ask their local library to acquire it – so it becomes available to many people. In my experience, libraries never say no to such a request.

(Ed. note: the book is $99.95 and available directly from the publisher, CCNM Press. For more information on how to get the book, contact K. Fisher, email: kfisher@ccnm.edu or call (416) 498-1255 ext. 239)

Write a Comment

view all comments