Are Humans an Endangered Species?

In the fall of 1999 I attended a conference in Toronto on “Reproductive Health Hazards”. Organized by occupational health clinics, the Canadian Auto Workers’ Union, the Canadian Labour Congress, the Ontario Federation of Labour, and the United Steelworkers of America. It was sponsored by the World Health Organization. The WHO speaker showed a computer model predicting that humanity could be extinct within 500 years if our use of pesticides and other environmental toxins continues.

In January of 2006, we learned that federal Minister of Health Tony Clement, NDP Leader Jack Layton, Environment Minister Rona Ambrose, and others, were tested for 103 pollutants. The resulting report, entitled “Toxic Nation on Parliament Hill”, revealed that up to 55 pollutants were found in these MPs, such as PCBs, organochlorines, organophosphates, heavy metals, flame retardants – all of which are known carcinogens and endocrine disruptors. These politicians were all born before the enormous increase in environmental toxins began in the 1950’s and they, therefore, started life with their livers still healthy and able to detoxify the increasing toxic load. On the other hand, children born more recently ingested these environmental toxins through their mothers’ umbilical chords, which often damaged their livers and reduced their ability to detoxify. Furthermore, these politicians bore their children before their sperm and eggs could be similarly attacked by those poisons our governments are supposed to protect us from.

In the fall of 1999 I attended a conference in Toronto on “Reproductive Health Hazards”. Organized by occupational health clinics, the Canadian Auto Workers’ Union, the Canadian Labour Congress, the Ontario Federation of Labour, and the United Steelworkers of America. It was sponsored by the World Health Organization. The WHO speaker showed a computer model predicting that humanity could be extinct within 500 years if our use of pesticides and other environmental toxins continues. In January of 2006, we learned that federal Minister of Health Tony Clement, NDP Leader Jack Layton, Environment Minister Rona Ambrose, and others, were tested for 103 pollutants. The resulting report, entitled “Toxic Nation on Parliament Hill”, revealed that up to 55 pollutants were found in these MPs, such as PCBs, organochlorines, organophosphates, heavy metals, flame retardants – all of which are known carcinogens and endocrine disruptors . These politicians were all born before the enormous increase in environmental toxins began in the 1950’s and they, therefore, started life with their livers still healthy and able to detoxify the increasing toxic load. On the other hand, children born more recently ingested these environmental toxins through their mothers’ umbilical chords, which often damaged their livers and reduced their ability to detoxify. Furthermore, these politicians bore their children before their sperm and eggs could be similarly attacked by those poisons our governments are supposed to protect us from.

The Human Genome Project conducted by the US National Institutes of Health recently added to its mandate the Environmental Human Genome Project when some 200 genes were identified which are particularly sensitive to specific environmental toxins. Many of these turned out to be regulatory genes and, therefore, of importance to fetal development and later to all body functions and cell repair. The environmental toxins threatening these genes are known to inhibit the body’s natural detoxification pathways, and cause cancer, low birth weight, inability to conceive, and birth defects.

In the November 30, 2006, issue of Nature, the discovery of a protein p63 was reported which, when inhibited or damaged by environmental toxins and their associated nutritional deficiencies, results in the death of female eggs. Back in the 1940’s, experimental research by Andre Voisin showed that merely depriving animals of manganese resulted in sterility, even though the animals appeared otherwise perfectly healthy. Supplementation with this trace mineral made them fertile again. Today, our soils are becoming more and more mineral deficient due to corporate farming methods, and simultaneously our environment has become an ever-increasing toxic soup resulting in cancer and other chronic diseases.

Cancer and infertility now appear to have parallel functions. Central to cancer is understanding a tumour protein p53 located in every single cell of the body; its job is to ensure that potentially faulty cells are killed (apoptosis) before they proliferate and become cancer cells. It is well-known that environmental toxins classified as carcinogens turn off p53 and that substances like beta carotene can turn it back on (the principle supporting the highly successful Gerson therapy).

The Human Genome Project conducted by the US National Institutes of Health recently added to its mandate the Environmental Human Genome Project when some 200 genes were identified which are particularly sensitive to specific environmental toxins. Many of these turned out to be regulatory genes and, therefore, of importance to fetal development and later to all body functions and cell repair. The environmental toxins threatening these genes are known to inhibit the body’s natural detoxification pathways, and cause cancer, low birth weight, inability to conceive, and birth defects. In the November 30, 2006, issue of Nature, the discovery of a protein p63 was reported which, when inhibited or damaged by environmental toxins and their associated nutritional deficiencies, results in the death of female eggs. Back in the 1940’s, experimental research by Andre Voisin showed that merely depriving animals of manganese resulted in sterility, even though the animals appeared otherwise perfectly healthy. Supplementation with this trace mineral made them fertile again. Today, our soils are becoming more and more mineral deficient due to corporate farming methods, and simultaneously our environment has become an ever-increasing toxic soup resulting in cancer and other chronic diseases. Cancer and infertility now appear to have parallel functions. Central to cancer is understanding a tumour protein p53 located in every single cell of the body; its job is to ensure that potentially faulty cells are killed (apoptosis) before they proliferate and become cancer cells. It is well-known that environmental toxins classified as carcinogens turn off p53 and that substances like beta carotene can turn it back on (the principle supporting the highly successful Gerson therapy).

As reported in the November 30, 2006, issue of Nature, a parallel process has been discovered in another protein: p63. It regulates the health of female eggs in their formative stage, called oocytes; p63 identifies oocytes damaged by toxins or radiation and kills them, often all of them, causing sterility.

A plethora of research has confirmed that sperm count, quality, and motility, in the men of the industrialized world is down by as much as 55%, compared to the 1950’s, and in some countries the fear that all men will be sterile within 80 to a 100 years is seriously discussed. The causes of this impending disaster are well documented in humans as well as animals across several genera and include some 50 specific pesticides such as 2,4-D, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT, excessive ozone in the air, heavy metal exposure in food and dentistry as well as wood preservatives, radiation, trichloroethylene found in medical cleaning fluids and dry cleaning chemicals, certain pharmaceutical drugs, all conventional cancer therapies, and even in disposable diapers which, in addition to containing carcinogenic and endocrine disrupting chlorine, may also cause scrotal temperatures to be slightly higher, thereby inhibiting the development for subsequent sperm production.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND DIETARY CAUSES OF INFERTILITY

Infertility in both sexes ranges now from 15% in China to 30% in Europe. While infertility in men is primarily caused by estrogenic substances, for women the whole process from conception to birthing a viable baby is a hazardous journey during which exposure to pesticides, flame retardants, lice treatment medication, or drinking water containing mere traces of nitrates from fertilizers (all during that most vulnerable first trimester) increases risk of miscarriage or stillbirth by 70%. Miscarriages and stillborn babies happen now at twice the rate in the US than in China. And on some North American Indian reserves (often located close to toxic dumps) the rate of stillbirths is 50%. In these communities another problem is the declining sex ratio in favour of mostly girls: pesticides are xenoestrogens, i.e. chemical analogs of female sex hormones, and as all fetuses in their earliest stage are female, the differentiation of roughly 50% of them into subsequent male children is prevented by this excess of phony female sex hormones in the pregnant women.

Barriers to conception include especially the prolonged use of the birth control pill and an even just slightly lowered thyroid function (also due to pesticides and radiation).

Unexpected barriers to fertility have also turned up in the soy products so popular as substitutes for meat, fish and eggs. Soy has powerful contraceptive properties due to its estrogenic content, as well as a compound called genistein which effectively stops sperm from reaching the egg. Apparently, the actress Julia Roberts was a case in point; when she stopped eating soy products she finally became pregnant.

And the hype about low-fat foods, with its attendant desire to be pre-pubescently slim, does not support Mother Nature’s protocol for pregnancy. Low maternal body weight causes miscarriages, not only because skinny moms don’t have enough body fat to support a developing fetus, but because low body weight happens to reduce iron and vitamin B levels, especially folic acid without which a viable baby is impossible.

Similarly, a dogmatic insistence on a strict vegetarian diet, devoid even of eggs, can prevent pregnancy (especially in women whose ancestors relied on animal proteins – making them genetically predisposed to requiring them). In one interview, nutritionist Susie Langley of Toronto described women who ate a vegan diet, generally on the run, and were thus lacking in most B vitamins, some important essential amino acids, and also the essential cholesterol necessary to permit synthesizing the sex hormones required for pregnancy. Happily, they became pregnant as soon as they started to eat differently. (Medical Post, April 8, 2003)

As World Wildlife Fund scientist Theo Colborn observes: “The endocrine system is so fine-tuned that it depends upon hormones in concentrations as little as a tenth of a trillion of a gram to control womb environment, as inconspicuous as one second in 3,169 centuries.”

Mother Nature has a timetable. She likes fresh eggs.  If you are 40 years old and look 25, your eggs are still 40 years old and so is your uterus, and your fallopian tubes are already “likely to be as scarred as antique furniture”, as Julie Vargo and Maureen Regan observe in their excellent book A Few Good Eggs.

Addiction (in both sexes) to tobacco, coffee, and alcohol presents serious barriers to conception, successful pregnancies, and healthy children. And in women, the addiction to exercise and the fear of becoming fat is especially serious. You do become quite fat while pregnant, and Nature expects you to enjoy that. Becoming pregnant requires the mentality of a cow chewing cud while blissing out on a sunny pasture.

The whole process from love-making to raising a healthy toddler is languid, timeless, random, and non-goal-oriented. One cannot have a baby and assume to return to work as if nothing had happened. Unfortunately, most of us have frantic lifestyles fundamentally at odds with Nature. Our lives are also unnatural due to light pollution which interferes with normal ovulatory cycles. Conceiving a baby and going through a successful pregnancy is not likely to happen on the run, like drive-through banking.  The great peace activist and scientist, Professor Ursula Franklin of the University of Toronto put it charmingly in the 1989 Massey Lectures when she observed: “Although I was intellectually quite prepared for the birth of my first child, I was stunned by the degree of randomness that this event created in my life. It took me a while to understand that it was pointless to plan my days the way I used to … I needed different schemes to deal with the un-planable.”

Indeed, this surrender to Nature may explain why couples who adopt a child, after having given up on conceiving one themselves, wind up getting pregnant after the adoption. Relating to a child often prepares the body for conception, perhaps because the fundamental change of pace from goal-oriented to primarily relational supports the production of all the right hormones in the brain where the chemistry of conception and sexuality is orchestrated. I saw this frequently when I ran an adoption agency in the 1970’s. In my experience, both the adoption and the surprise pregnancy made such families very happy.

ENVIRONMENTAL TOXINS AND BIRTH DEFECTS

But there is something even worse than not being able to have a baby, and that is having one that is born with nervous system and organ damage — caused by the tendency of environmental toxins to interfere with absorption of vital nutrients which become unavailable for building healthy organs and brains. The most definitive proof for this comes from the three decade-long study by Dr. Elizabeth Guillette conducted in Mexico, where she compared children exposed to agricultural pesticides during their fetal stages with those whose mothers were never exposed to them.

More recent research has shown that a child’s IQ is seriously compromised in the uterus by the mother’s exposure to mercury, and the June 3, 2005 issue of Science reported that exposure to pesticides in the womb, especially methoxychlor used in vineyards, programs the genes in the fetus to predispose the child later in life to various diseases and infertility. These so-called epigenetic trans-generational actions are also possible through certain pharmaceutical drugs, such as the now well-known case of DES (diethylstilbestrol), once used to control nausea during pregnancy. (Magnesium supplementation and avoidance of refined wheat, salt, and sugar generally does the trick in alleviating nausea perfectly, and causes no harm.)

Even slightly deficient nutrition has the same disruptive power across generations, as Dr. Pottenger showed in his famous experiment with some 900 cats over several generations: the third generation was always sterile.

THE LAWS OF NATURE BESTOW FERTILITY – AND TAKE IT AWAY

After interviewing Theo Colborn about her famous book Our Stolen Future, and Professor Guillette about her project in Mexico, I became so concerned about the future of humanity that I decided to publish an excellent book by Toronto’s Dr. Patrick Hewlett, a fertility physician with more than 30 years’ experience in fertility medicine. This new book, We Can’t Have A Baby, is a “practical guide to the management of infertility — with and without the new technologies.” This book is supremely practical. No fluff here and a keen insight into why the high-tech approach is not necessarily good. Couples with fertility problems often endure high-tech experimentation and need information on what works and what doesn’t. Dr. Patrick Hewlett takes a patient-centered view which has fortified him against being bamboozled by high-tech pipe dreams. He teaches couples how nature works with and for them. Dr. Hewlett’s chapter “You are what you eat” is especially helpful.

In this connection the recent discovery by University of Saskatchewan’s Dr. Roger Pierson and his team is encouraging: conception was thought to be possible only during a few days every month but is now known to be possible so frequently as to be seen like a “wave” process.

Favouring patience and natural approaches is important because test-tube babies have double the risk of major birth defects and often are dangerously underweight at birth.  According to two major studies in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002, it is not clear yet whether the quality of the eggs and sperm are the reason, or if the invasive process itself is to blame. Other technological interventions can result in multiple births with some babies not being viable.

Mother Nature made rules more despotic than any carved in stone. They are encoded in something less negotiable, namely dynamically interdependent organic matter. Her three main dictates have been identified by Malthus, Darwin, and modern toxicology.  Malthus noticed that creatures die out if their numbers outstrip the food supply. Darwin taught that animals are completely dependent upon their environments to which they must adapt, or become extinct, if they don’t evolve into environmentally compatible forms (e.g. dinosaurs into birds). Today, modern toxicology teaches us that if you mess with the quality of the food supply and ignore, even the tiniest bit, Mother Nature’s protocols for the creation of babies and the maintenance of health, then our numbers will rapidly decline until there is no tomorrow. The hardy cockroaches, which are hundreds of millions of years old and even saw the dinosaurs come and go, will prevail instead.

As reported in the November 30, 2006, issue of Nature, a parallel process has been discovered in another protein: p63. It regulates the health of female eggs in their formative stage, called oocytes; p63 identifies oocytes damaged by toxins or radiation and kills them, often all of them, causing sterility. A plethora of research has confirmed that sperm count, quality, and motility, in the men of the industrialized world is down by as much as 55%, compared to the 1950’s, and in some countries the fear that all men will be sterile within 80 to a 100 years is seriously discussed. The causes of this impending disaster are well documented in humans as well as animals across several genera and include some 50 specific pesticides such as 2,4-D, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT, excessive ozone in the air, heavy metal exposure in food and dentistry as well as wood preservatives, radiation, trichloroethylene found in medical cleaning fluids and dry cleaning chemicals, certain pharmaceutical drugs, all conventional cancer therapies, and even in disposable diapers which, in addition to containing carcinogenic and endocrine disrupting chlorine, may also cause scrotal temperatures to be slightly higher, thereby inhibiting the development for subsequent sperm production.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND DIETARY CAUSES OF INFERTILITY

Infertility in both sexes ranges now from 15% in China to 30% in Europe. While infertility in men is primarily caused by estrogenic substances, for women the whole process from conception to birthing a viable baby is a hazardous journey during which exposure to pesticides, flame retardants, lice treatment medication, or drinking water containing mere traces of nitrates from fertilizers (all during that most vulnerable first trimester) increases risk of miscarriage or stillbirth by 70%. Miscarriages and stillborn babies happen now at twice the rate in the US than in China. And on some North American Indian reserves (often located close to toxic dumps) the rate of stillbirths is 50%. In these communities another problem is the declining sex ratio in favour of mostly girls: pesticides are xenoestrogens, i.e. chemical analogs of female sex hormones, and as all fetuses in their earliest stage are female, the differentiation of roughly 50% of them into subsequent male children is prevented by this excess of phony female sex hormones in the pregnant women.

Barriers to conception include especially the prolonged use of the birth control pill and an even just slightly lowered thyroid function (also due to pesticides and radiation).

Unexpected barriers to fertility have also turned up in the soy products so popular as substitutes for meat, fish and eggs. Soy has powerful contraceptive properties due to its estrogenic content, as well as a compound called genistein which effectively stops sperm from reaching the egg. Apparently, the actress Julia Roberts was a case in point; when she stopped eating soy products she finally became pregnant.

And the hype about low-fat foods, with its attendant desire to be pre-pubescently slim, does not support Mother Nature’s protocol for pregnancy. Low maternal body weight causes miscarriages, not only because skinny moms don’t have enough body fat to support a developing fetus, but because low body weight happens to reduce iron and vitamin B levels, especially folic acid without which a viable baby is impossible.

Similarly, a dogmatic insistence on a strict vegetarian diet, devoid even of eggs, can prevent pregnancy (especially in women whose ancestors relied on animal proteins – making them genetically predisposed to requiring them). In one interview, nutritionist Susie Langley of Toronto described women who ate a vegan diet, generally on the run, and were thus lacking in most B vitamins, some important essential amino acids, and also the essential cholesterol necessary to permit synthesizing the sex hormones required for pregnancy. Happily, they became pregnant as soon as they started to eat differently. (Medical Post, April 8, 2003)

As World Wildlife Fund scientist Theo Colborn observes: “The endocrine system is so fine-tuned that it depends upon hormones in concentrations as little as a tenth of a trillion of a gram to control womb environment, as inconspicuous as one second in 3,169 centuries.”

Mother Nature has a timetable. She likes fresh eggs. If you are 40 years old and look 25, your eggs are still 40 years old and so is your uterus, and your fallopian tubes are already “likely to be as scarred as antique furniture”, as Julie Vargo and Maureen Regan observe in their excellent book A Few Good Eggs.

Addiction (in both sexes) to tobacco, coffee, and alcohol presents serious barriers to conception, successful pregnancies, and healthy children. And in women, the addiction to exercise and the fear of becoming fat is especially serious. You do become quite fat while pregnant, and Nature expects you to enjoy that. Becoming pregnant requires the mentality of a cow chewing cud while blissing out on a sunny pasture.

The whole process from love-making to raising a healthy toddler is languid, timeless, random, and non-goal-oriented. One cannot have a baby and assume to return to work as if nothing had happened. Unfortunately, most of us have frantic lifestyles fundamentally at odds with Nature. Our lives are also unnatural due to light pollution which interferes with normal ovulatory cycles. Conceiving a baby and going through a successful pregnancy is not likely to happen on the run, like drive-through banking. The great peace activist and scientist, Professor Ursula Franklin of the University of Toronto put it charmingly in the 1989 Massey Lectures when she observed: “Although I was intellectually quite prepared for the birth of my first child, I was stunned by the degree of randomness that this event created in my life. It took me a while to understand that it was pointless to plan my days the way I used to … I needed different schemes to deal with the un-planable.”

Indeed, this surrender to Nature may explain why couples who adopt a child, after having given up on conceiving one themselves, wind up getting pregnant after the adoption. Relating to a child often prepares the body for conception, perhaps because the fundamental change of pace from goal-oriented to primarily relational supports the production of all the right hormones in the brain where the chemistry of conception and sexuality is orchestrated. I saw this frequently when I ran an adoption agency in the 1970’s. In my experience, both the adoption and the surprise pregnancy made such families very happy.

ENVIRONMENTAL TOXINS AND BIRTH DEFECTS

But there is something even worse than not being able to have a baby, and that is having one that is born with nervous system and organ damage — caused by the tendency of environmental toxins to interfere with absorption of vital nutrients which become unavailable for building healthy organs and brains. The most definitive proof for this comes from the three decade-long study by Dr. Elizabeth Guillette conducted in Mexico, where she compared children exposed to agricultural pesticides during their fetal stages with those whose mothers were never exposed to them.

More recent research has shown that a child’s IQ is seriously compromised in the uterus by the mother’s exposure to mercury, and the June 3, 2005 issue of Science reported that exposure to pesticides in the womb, especially methoxychlor used in vineyards, programs the genes in the fetus to predispose the child later in life to various diseases and infertility. These so-called epigenetic trans-generational actions are also possible through certain pharmaceutical drugs, such as the now well-known case of DES (diethylstilbestrol), once used to control nausea during pregnancy. (Magnesium supplementation and avoidance of refined wheat, salt, and sugar generally does the trick in alleviating nausea perfectly, and causes no harm.)

Even slightly deficient nutrition has the same disruptive power across generations, as Dr. Pottenger showed in his famous experiment with some 900 cats over several generations: the third generation was always sterile.

THE LAWS OF NATURE BESTOW FERTILITY – AND TAKE IT AWAY

After interviewing Theo Colborn about her famous book Our Stolen Future, and Professor Guillette about her project in Mexico, I became so concerned about the future of humanity that I decided to publish an excellent book by Toronto’s Dr. Patrick Hewlett, a fertility physician with more than 30 years’ experience in fertility medicine. This new book, We Can’t Have A Baby, is a “practical guide to the management of infertility — with and without the new technologies.” This book is supremely practical. No fluff here and a keen insight into why the high-tech approach is not necessarily good. Couples with fertility problems often endure high-tech experimentation and need information on what works and what doesn’t. Dr. Patrick Hewlett takes a patient-centered view which has fortified him against being bamboozled by high-tech pipe dreams. He teaches couples how nature works with and for them. Dr. Hewlett’s chapter “You are what you eat” is especially helpful.

In this connection the recent discovery by University of Saskatchewan’s Dr. Roger Pierson and his team is encouraging: conception was thought to be possible only during a few days every month but is now known to be possible so frequently as to be seen like a “wave” process.

Favouring patience and natural approaches is important because test-tube babies have double the risk of major birth defects and often are dangerously underweight at birth. According to two major studies in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002, it is not clear yet whether the quality of the eggs and sperm are the reason, or if the invasive process itself is to blame. Other technological interventions can result in multiple births with some babies not being viable.

Mother Nature made rules more despotic than any carved in stone. They are encoded in something less negotiable, namely dynamically interdependent organic matter. Her three main dictates have been identified by Malthus, Darwin, and modern toxicology. Malthus noticed that creatures die out if their numbers outstrip the food supply. Darwin taught that animals are completely dependent upon their environments to which they must adapt, or become extinct, if they don’t evolve into environmentally compatible forms (e.g. dinosaurs into birds). Today, modern toxicology teaches us that if you mess with the quality of the food supply and ignore, even the tiniest bit, Mother Nature’s protocols for the creation of babies and the maintenance of health, then our numbers will rapidly decline until there is no tomorrow. The hardy cockroaches, which are hundreds of millions of years old and even saw the dinosaurs come and go, will prevail instead.

References

  • T. Colborn et al, Our Stolen Future, 1997, Penguin
  • Dr. P. Hewlett, We Can’t Have A Baby, 2006, Kos Publishing 519-927-1049
  • Dr. D. Rapp, Our Toxic World: A Wake Up Call, 2003, Kos Publishing Inc. 519-927-1049
  • Dr. S. Rogers, Detoxify or Die, Prestige, 2003, for information on how to detoxify 1-800-846-6687
  • J. Vargo & M. Regan, A Few Good Eggs, 2006 from www.afewgoodeggs.com
  • A. Voisin, Soil Grass and Cancer, 1959, Crosby Lockwood UK; out of print, photocopy edition through Kos Inc, 519-927-1049
  • Dr. K.-G Wenzel & R. Pataracchia, The Earth’s Gift to Medicine: Minerals in Health and Disease, 2005, Kos Publishing, 519-927-1049
  • www.chem.-tox.com/infertility on avoidable environmental hazards
  • www.westonprice.org/women/wise_choices.html on nutrition, light pollution, and toxicans
  • www.afewgoodeggs.com practical advice based on personal experience
  • www.mayoclinic.com on environmental impacts on fertility

Scientific Sources:

  • The studies on problems with high-tech infertility procedures were published in March 2002 in the New England Journal of Medicine were done at the Center for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, and the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the details were reported in The Toronto Star, March 7, 2002, p. A21. See also report in The Medical Post, February 19, 2002, p. 28.
  • On soy products and infertility see BBC news report on June 21, 2005. For comprehensive information on soy products in this respect go to the research published on the website of the Weston Price Foundation: www.price-pottenger.org and read K.T. Daniel, The Whole Soy Story, New Trends, 2005
  • U. Franklin, The Real World of Technology, CBC Massey Lectures, 1989, p.83 (revised and expanded edition Anansi, 1999)
  • On how the toxicology of endocrine disruptors actually works see Journal of Pesticide Reform, Winter 2006
  • On declining sex ratios among native peoples see Environmental Health Perspectives, October 2005, article by C.A. Mackenzie et al
  • On the fertility-compromising nature of birth control pills see Weston Price Foundation (www.westonprice.org) article by Kate Singer and references therein to the work of Samuel Epstein as well as his book The Breast Cancer Prevention Program, MacMillan, 1997
  • On thyroid function and fertility as well as IQ in children see Environmental Health Perspectives September 12, 2003, article entitled National Institutes of Environmental Health Studies: News
  • On underweight issues and pregnancy see International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, December 4, 2006, on-line issue: press release
  • On environmental impacts on fertility:
    Environmental Health Perspectives: H. Shanna et al. “Semen Quality in Relation to Biomarkers of Pesticide Exposure” and R. Hauser et al. “The Relationship between Human Semen Parameters and Environmental Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls and pp’-DDE”. September 2003. M. Deana et al. “A Review of Nitrates in Drinking Water: Maternal Exposure and Adverse Reproductive and Developmental Outcomes.” In Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 114, issue 3, March 2006.
  • Z. Rebecca et al. “Exposure to Environmental Ozone Alters Semen Quality.” Environmental Health Perspectives, volume 114, no. 3, March 2006
  • Medical Post April 1, 2003 on metal-cleaning chemical and dry cleaning fluids
  • Medical Post October 10, 2009, on diapers and male fertility
  • Google World Health Organization on male fertility rates
  • C. Christina et al. “Workgroup Report: Implementing a National Occupational Reproductive Research Agenda – Decade One and Beyond” in Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 114, no 3, March 2006
  • Regarding fertile days being numerous during the menstrual cycle see: government of Saskatchewan: https://www.sk25.ca Science Achievements or google Dr. Roger Pierson which takes you directly to his 2003 research announcements.
  • On mercury and IQ see Environmental Health Perspectives, National Institutes of Health report January 11, 2007 available for free on https://dx.doi.org
  • On fetal brain development see Focus, Harvard Medical, Dental and Public Health Schools, newsletter of December 1, 2006, and google Elizabeth Guillette in order to get the latest articles on her still ongoing Mexico project relating to pesticide exposure and fetal development
  • For Pottenger’s cat experiment go to www.westonprice.org and see F. M. Pottenger, Pottenger’s Cats: A Study in Nutrition, 1983

Helke Ferrie is a medical science writer with a master's degree in physical anthropology. Her specialty lies in investigative research into ethical issues in medicine and the politics of health. She started her investigative journalism career in the mid-1990s, looking at issues of medicine and environment. She has been a regular contributor to Vitality Magazine ever since. Helke has also authored several books on various subjects including: "Ending Denial: The Lyme Disease Epidemic", "What Part of No! Don't They Understand: Rescuing Food and Medicine from Government Abuse", and "The Earth's Gift to Medicine". Here are links to some of her works: Book Review Find her book -Ending Denial Read her article: When governments abandon the public interest — look out for your own health Find her book -What Part of No! Don't They Understand Helke has also been a regular contributor for the Vitality Magazine. Links to few of her articles: The Tyranny of Government Protection Success Story - How I Recovered from Lyme Disease IN THE NEWS: Fluoride Dangers; Roundup Lawsuits; Lyme Disease Epidemic Helke Ferrie now lives a retired life and can be reached at helkeferrie@gmail.com

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